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Food for the Poor Godspy.com: Faith at the Edge

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Reviews > TV

“Lost,” that endless engrossing philosophical mish-mash

“Lost,” that endless engrossing philosophical mish-mash Like cramming fistfuls of metaphysical crayons back into their tiny box, the Island on "Lost" can barely contain all the colorful epistemologies in its midst. It is a big stew of Philosophy 101's greatest hits... It's like the Monty Python sketch, "International Philosophy," in which Greek and German philosophers battle it out on the soccer field (Socrates's winning goal is contested by Hegel as not being an "a priori reality"). Back on "Lost" Philosophy Island, the implications are just as absurd: After all, if everything is imbued with meaning, then how meaningful is any one thing? READ MORE >

(0) COMMENTS  |  TOPICS:    lost | philosophy

Opinion > TV

Did anyone miss the Golden Globes show?

The Golden Globes awards were awarded last night, but without the usual glitzy televised gala, thanks to the Writer’s Guild strike. This prompts the question—how essential is the show anyway? Sure, we get to rubberneck on the red carpet thanks to first-hand reporting from second-hand personalities like Joan Rivers and that embarrassing… READ MORE >


Reviews > TV

J.J.  Abrams’ Mystery Boxes

J.J.  Abrams’ Mystery Boxes With the debut of his latest TV series Fringe last week, J. J. Abrams—the writer/director/producer behind Lost, Felicity, and Alias—is back in the spotlight to talk about why he did the things he did with his new, much anticipated sci-fi show. Opening to mixed reviews, the X-Files-esque-medical-puzzle series promises to deliver… READ MORE >

(0) COMMENTS  |  TOPICS:    fringe | j.j. abrams | lost | mystery

News > TV

Dirty Jobs’ Mike Rowe on the Dignity of Labor

"Dirty Jobs is an homage to George Plimpton, with a nod to Studs Terkel--an introduction, Rowe says, to the 'men and women who do the kinds of jobs that make civilized life possible for the rest of us.' Watching Rowe struggle with a forklift or wade through raw sewage is good, nasty fun. But for all the bathroom humor, his real curiosity about and respect for his subjects telegraphs a powerful message: There's dignity in hard work, expertise in unexpected places, and deep satisfaction in tackling and finishing a tough job." READ MORE >


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