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News > Faith

On The Road Through Nothingness

On The Road Through Nothingness It’s rare to see a positive story about the Catholic Church in the mainstream media, especially in newer online-only publications like Slate, but Harold Fickett, a Godspy contributing editor, managed to publish an essay there recently about the Clear Creek Monastery, a new and growing contemplative Benedictine monastery in Kansas, and the wider story of how Catholic religious communities are attracting young people. It could be that the critical success of the three-hour documentary, Into Great Silence, which had a long run at Manhattan’s Film Forum in 2007, left an impression on the editors. The appeal of that movie is captured in Harold’s ending: “From its rich liturgical rites to the pastoral details of its life as a working farm, as the monks raise sheep, make furniture, tend their orchard, and care for a huge vegetable garden, Clear Creek is what a monastery is meant to be—a sign of paradise. Father Anderson says, ‘We were only a bunch of bums, but by becoming nothing, you can be a part of something great.’" READ MORE >

(3) COMMENTS  |  TOPICS:    clear creek | monasteries | monks

Magazine > Faith

Struggling with the Rosary

Struggling with the Rosary The Rosary is excruciating. There I said it. Archbishop Fulton Sheen said it was the most perfect prayer because it takes 19 minutes, which is the maximum time the average person can maintain a state of concentration. The truth is the Rosary can be a real chore. St. Thérèse, the Little Flower, was being more honest when she said,… READ MORE >


Opinion > Business

Thinking Catholic: European leaders blame crisis on “speculative capitalism”

Thinking Catholic: European leaders blame crisis on “speculative capitalism” Europe’s financiers were seduced by the lure of easy subprime mortgage profits, just like everyone else, and they’re suffering now, just like everyone else. But give Europe credit for one thing: Thanks to its Catholic roots, Europe’s leaders understand that the financial crisis wasn’t caused by some vague form of “greed”; it was… READ MORE >


Opinion > Issues

The Right’s Hypocritical Crusade against Wall Street

The Right’s Hypocritical Crusade against Wall Street I almost never agree with First Things on economic policy, but Robert T. Miller was right last week when he warned that “those on the political right need to make sure that the Republicans in Congress do not through ignorance or stupidity misunderstand conservative economic principles and so lead us into economic disaster.” Unfortunately,… READ MORE >


Opinion > Issues

They’ll Believe in Anything: Study says atheists are more irrational

They’ll Believe in Anything: Study says atheists are more irrational A new Gallup study, “What Americans Really Believe,” suggests that if anti-religious crusaders Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins want a more rational, less superstitious world, they should encourage people to go to church.  A recent Wall Street Journal article reported that, according to the study… “…traditional Christian… READ MORE >


Opinion > Culture

Adam and Eve make a stand in California

Adam and Eve make a stand in California You connect the dots: A California couple refuses to submit to the state’s new “gender-neutral” marriage license that replaces bride and groom with “Party A” and “Party B.” Buried within a Scientific American article on storytelling and the brain (cited by John Murphy below) is a fascinating discovery made by “literary Darwinists”… READ MORE >


Opinion > Science/Tech

Secrets of storytelling

Secrets of storytelling Having just read a collection of masterful short-stories by Tobias Wolff, the issue of what makes storytelling such an intrinsic, necessary part of the human condition has been at the forefront of my mind. An article in the most recent issue of Scientific American approaches this age-old question from a left-brained perspective: “Popular… READ MORE >

(5) COMMENTS  |  TOPICS:    brain | cognition | empathy | love | storytelling

News > Business

The Fleecing of America

Yes, greed fueled the crisis, but Cohen pinpoints what's unique about our penchant for financial manias: "...the U.S. economy is being socialized to the tune of $700 billion ($2,000 for every man, woman and child in the country) as a result of a giant mortgage-related Ponzi scheme... Let’s be clear: this is an American mess forged by the American genius for new-fangled financial instruments in an era where the mantra has been that government is dumb and the markets are smart and risk is non-existent." READ MORE >


Opinion > Politics

The Democrats are Blowing the Election—and the Catholic Vote

The Democrats are Blowing the Election—and the Catholic Vote The best thing about how the Democratic Party is kicking away what should be an easy victory in the November presidential election is that it might force them to finally reassess their support for abortion and gay marriage, positions that are unpopular with working class voters, their natural constituency. A subplot here is how the Dems were… READ MORE >


Opinion > Business

The Church on the financial meltdown: Usury and speculation are to blame

The Church on the financial meltdown: Usury and speculation are to blame If there’s anyone in the mainstream media willing to listen to the Church these days (I doubt it), they’ll discover that centuries of Catholic teaching about the sinful practices of usury and financial speculation can explain why Wall Street is tumbling down. (For the best technical explanation, read The Trillion Dollar Meltdown: Easy… READ MORE >


Opinion > Politics

David Brooks explains the Republican Party’s Catholic problem

David Brooks explains the Republican Party’s Catholic problem In a NY Times column today called “The Social Animal,” David Brooks pinpoints exactly why so many Catholics hold their noses every four years as they vote Republican for president merely because of the party’s stance against abortion and gay marriage.   As any Catholic who’s watched a Republican convention knows, the GOP… READ MORE >


Opinion > Movies

Alfred Hitchcock: Mistaken Identities

Alfred Hitchcock: Mistaken Identities The Times Literary Supplement just ran two reviews of recent books about Alfred Hitchcock, the iconic filmmaker whose morbid Catholicism bled into the edges of such classics as Vertigo, I Confess, and Shadow of a Doubt. His movies—popular entertainments in their own time, snubbed by critics and award-givers—have since become the subject… READ MORE >

(0) COMMENTS  |  TOPICS:    guilt | hitchcock | suspense

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