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Food for the Poor Godspy.com: Faith at the Edge

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Joe Schriner

Joe Schriner | 0 posts | Member since 03.07.08

Comments

RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
Angelo... I am, indeed, for real. During Campaign 2004 swing through Wisconsin, I told the La Cross News that, not only was I real, but I couldn't see lying on my death bed some day, looking our children in the eye, and saying: "I knew all this was going on (in the world) -- but I was too busy making money." After you've taken some time to read the postion papers, etc., Angelo, let others know about us, if you would. God has really given you a talent to write. --Joe Schriner Ps...As you allude to in your piece, our platform is all about treating the roots of society's problems, not putting bandages on the symptoms.


RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
I'm a Catholic of the ilk this publication seems to be about. I am also an independent presidential candidate who has run in the past three election cycles. My wife and I have given up our careers (because we just couldn't sit by anymore as concerned, better yet "alarmed," laity). And with our three children we have traveled some 82,000 campaign miles, to date. Our message has been carried in more than 2,000 newspapers, almost 200 regional network TV news shows, hundreds of radio shows... I have also talked in hundreds of Catholic churches across the country, many colleges (Xavier, University of Dayton, Franciscan University, Mississippi State University...) I am a former journalist who has spent the past 15 years doing extensive cross-country research for an expansive set of position papers. It has been a "Listening Tour" in the purest sense of that term. Cleveland's diocesan newspaper noted that my platform is based on "Catholic Social Teaching." And it is. I told the Herald Star in Stuebenville, Ohio, that we stand for a Consistent Life Ethic. No abortion, no death penalty, no euthanasia, no embryonic stem cell research, no poverty, no pollution (you know what I mean)... or anything else that ends life prematurely. On immigration, my family and I toured the border town of Juarez, Mexico, with a Catholic priest from Indiana who now runs an orphanage there. He showed us the sweeping abject poverty (little kids starving, people living in cobbled together shacks with no running water, no electricity... Then he took us to the fence and asked: "What do you think Jesus would do with the fence?" That was an easy one. At a monastery in Cottonwood, Idaho, I learned St. Benedict once said: "We should treat God's environment as we do the sacred vessels of the altar." Our platform reflects that. When it comes to agriculture, we are in line with Catholic Rural Life Association teaching. We believe in "Preferential Option for the Poor" and have researched, at length, programs to significantly impact World Hunger and programs to help little kids trying to dodge needles, hunger and bullets in the inner cities of this country, and around the world. When we're not on the road, our family lives in the inner city of Cleveland (intentionally) and we volunteer at a Catholic Worker outreach to the poor and we've set aside a room in our apartment ("Christ Room") for the homeless. Before the Iraq War, I marched in a Peace Protest in Findlay, Ohio, and told a reporter fromt the Findlay Courier newspaper that the reason I was marching is because Pope John Paul II had said a pre-emptive strike into Iraq was the wrong approach. And I posed this question to an ABC Reporter from Toledo that same day: "What if we let the Weapons Inspectors into Montana?" The point being, of course, that we're telling these other nations they can't have WMD's -- while we have some 10,000 of them aimed all over the world! Wouldn't the money going into these warheads be much better spent on the 24,000 people starving to death every day in the Third World? I could go on with this... but instead, I'd refer you to www.voteforjoe.com Angelo... Before you do the "Non-Vote" thing, I'd ask you (and others) to sincerely check our campaign out. It embodies what you guys seem to be about. And even though a write-in campaign may seem, oh, a long shot, to quote, well, you: "Anything can seem futile at first..." It would seem you guys have been waiting for a candidate like myself. Instead of continuing to curse the darkness, it's time to get behind us with more than just a vote, but rather: with all the energy you've got. in Christ and Our Lady (who is also the campaign manager) --Joe Schriner


RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
Damon... Thanks for taking the time to do the research and for your support of our campaign. e-mail me if you want a bumper sticker, etc. The whole thing is evolving right now as sort of a behind the scenes "loaves and fishes" phenomenon.


RE: Letting Bill Clinton Off Easy
I'm a Catholic and independent presidential candidate who gives talks in churches all over the country on abortion. To set the stage, I take them to Nazi Germany during World War II and say that on Sunday mornings some of the trains going to the Concentration Camps would slowly go by the Christian churches with children screaming, parents wailing. The response in the churches? They would turn the organ music up and sing louder. We become aghast at these accounts.. The year is now 2008, and today metaphorically there will be 4,400 little babies going down a metaphoric track on a metaphoric train -- to their deaths. And the response in many of the churches -- and among much of the readership of this magazine? Most, just as metaphorically, also sing louder. We busy ourselves with extra-curricular activity, with over work, with entertainment, with heavy thinking about just the right thing to write on abortion -- while meanwhile, these little babies continue to go to their deaths! Abortion would end tomorrow if, with the vigor and boldness of these Franciscan students, we went to the street corners of our towns every day with protest signs and rosaries. What the neighbors think, be damned. If we flooded the newspapers with pro-life letters to the editor, flooded our legislators with letters. If every other billboard was a pro-life billboard. If we started crisis pregnancy centers in every town and then staffed and funded them to the hilt (instead of spending the money on dinners at Applebies where we "talk" about how horrible abortion is over a spicy chicken salad). The fact is, we're worried about appearances so we won't go to our neighborhood street corners every day, every week. The fact is, television watching is more important than protesting and letter to the editor writing about this atrocity(just look at the time you spend on either in a week). The fact is, most of us wouldn't dream of house sharing, selling the car and taking the bus, skipping the dinners out, taking half (if not more) of our savings... and funding a genuine, full scale push to stop abortion. You know, I say in my talks: "Do you think any of this is lost on God? Hardly." The sins of ommission are so great among those who know how evil this Holocaust is, but still won't move out of their comfort zones to stop it. My wife and I gave up our careers, took to the road and try to fight this evil (and many others) at every turn. We're all called to be saints, not Applebies customers.


RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
Chassup... To even intimate my political platform (www.voteforjoe.com) would be linked to Marx, Hitler, Mussolini... is absolutely nuts. My platform is formed on tenents of Catholic Social teaching, across the board. When John the Baptist was asked what the people should do. He responded that if someone has two coats and someone else has none -- we should give the person without the coat, a coat. (This also means looking at the root cause of why the one person doesn't have a coat in the first place.) That's the essence of my platform. It's been my experience over all these years of campaigning, that people who try to link our platform to communism, etc., are trying real hard to hold on to both their coats Chassup. I think how the saying goes is: "When I gave a man some food, they called me a saint. When I started to ask why the man was hungry, they called me a communist." Ps... I'm not missing the mark my friend.


RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
Chassup... I, too, believe it's the church's responsibility to take care of the poor. However, you know as well as I that the church is falling, oh, a little short on that these days. Today in the world, 24,000 people (UN figure) starved to death. We live in the inner city of Cleveland (intentionally) and volunteer at a Catholic Worker outreach to the poor when I'm not out running for president. One of those guys froze to death over the weekend... When the church comes up short, wouldn't the next best thing in our country be for a majority of benevolent minded people (of all faiths, for instance) to step up and vote for proposals to help the poor, or for social justice leaning politicians, etc. This is how a democracy works... And I would differ with you about Catholic Social Teaching always inviting, but never imposing. When Jesus told the parable of "the rich guy and Lazarus the beggar at the gate (which some Catholic Social Teaching hinges on)," He said that because the rich guy doesn't help the poor guy, the rich guy goes to Hell. That would seem, oh, a little directive (read: imposing). Unless, of course, you want to go to Hell. It's all kind of like the parachute instructor who says to the jumpers just before going up: "When you jump out I would 'suggest' -- you pull the rip cord."


RE: None of the Above: The Only Vote Worth Casting in November?
Chassup wrote: "God's greatest gift is free will. [The rich guy] was free to love [Lazarrus] the beggar, or not." Of course he was. I never said he wasn't. However, Jesus tells us the consequence He will 'impose' for us not loving the beggar on this one is: Hell. Again, you have the sky diving instructor who says to the new jumpers: "Once you jump out of the plane, I'd 'invite' you to -- pull the rip cord." Each jumper still has free will, but... Also, I'd be interested to hear: Of the presidential candidates who are out there, which one is more in line with Catholic Social teaching than myself (www.voteforjoe.com)? I'd like to hear from you too on that one Angelo. Now, I could go on arguing with you ad infinitum on this thread Chassup, or I could go out and actually help the poor more. And, well... I think I'll pull the rip cord. God bless you.


RE: God, Government and Freedom—A Response to 'None of the Above'
Some of our research travels for our position paper on immigration took us to Juarez, Mexico, where we saw some of what you said you saw in Mexico too, Eric. In addition, we saw some 200,000 people living in cobbled together shacks with no running water, no electricity and the children were extremely hungry. My thoughts didn't turn to statist economics, or American protectionism, or... They turned to tears. And a drive to sacrifice every American comfort I could think of, while taking the savings to help these people. What's more, using running for president as a bully pulpit, I have often shared these alarming Juarez scenes in talks, in the media... with the hopes that other Americans would start to sacrifice more as well. Not only for the benefit of these poor -- but for the eternal benefit of the souls of those who choose to help. The root of the "Northern American Union" I propose is not about furthering the First World corporate version of globalization or trying to undermine law and order, or a One World Order agenda, or...; but rather it is about relaxing man-made boundaries in order to bring us closer together to build more cammarderie, empathy and help. One has to ask: "Was it God's intention for these artificial boundaries between countries?" Note: I find it interesting that when a candidate that lines up almost across the board with Catholic Social Teaching appears, the first thing that happens is a criticism of part of one platform point, as opposed to at least a modicum of support. Especially given the overall orientation of what this publication seems to be about.


RE: God, Government and Freedom—A Response to 'None of the Above'
Harold... My platform was developed as a result of 15 solid years and 200,000 miles of extensive cross country research. It is well reasoned in my thinking, just not apparently in yours. The platform is also simply stated on the site because, well, we have a tremendously diverse mix of readership, as you can imagine. Also besides materialism, another part of the delusional Zion you allude to is being sucked into perhaps too much reasoning and rationalizing -- and not enough doing. Rick... Before you write in your plumber's name (not that I have anything against your plumber), consider writing in my name (www.voteforjoe.com)


RE: God, Government and Freedom—A Response to 'None of the Above'
In regard to one aspect of subsidiarity in America... To move from centralism and the current Welfare state, we must have way more people of faith who are willing to step up and really help those in need. For instance, our family has intentionally moved to the inner city of Cleveland to live side by side with poor who have been caught in generational poverty loops and abandoned by white flight. We live among a group of Catholic Workers who have put their lives on the line in a gang war zone to help the poor, to coach Rec Center teams with kids that don't have a father at home, to provide micro-loans and gifts to their neighbors... In this one small part of the city, decentralism (to at least a degree) is working. Now, there would naturally be a shift to a subsidiarity orientation en mass in America, if, say, Christians (middle class and up) were really willing to sacrifice a lot more of their comfort (material stuff, personal safety...), slow their upwardly mobile climb, and really take the time to systemically help those caught in these poverty loops. Problem is, we'd rather have yet another dinner at Bob Evans, some comfortable furniture, the wide screen TV, the car with more options... It's not just the American Bishops who are short sighted on this (according to the article Eric alludes to), it's us and all the priests (who should be inspiring us in this direction) who themselves are eating out at Bob Evans then coming back to the Rectory at night in their new Honda where they sit in the easy chair and watch Sports Center. It's not all that difficult to argue for ideological constructs like subsidiarity -- from the easy chair.


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